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For William McInnes, quality leisure time is one big game

09/10/2019 Posted by admin

There’s a park not far from where I live which once would have?been called a caravan park, but these days?announces itself as a Leisure Park. It has a mini tennis court, pool and an amenities block.
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I know this because?there’s a sign boldly announcing such splendours awaiting prospective guests inside its gates. I look at the sign occasionally when afternoon traffic thickens like cooling gravy and coagulates. I saw, the other day, it was no longer a Leisure Park?but had morphed into a “Quality Leisure Park”.

The word “Quality” had a newer look. The rest of the sign was unchanged, presumably like the park itself, so it was a little perplexing why it had become a “Quality Leisure Park”.

Staring at the sign from my car I thought about the idea of leisure. It wasn’t a word much used when I was a kid, save by a grumpy maths teacher who’d employ it after ordering some task be carried out.

If a little slow going about your business he began with a bellow and built to scream, “McInnes, solve the next step of the problem on the board.” There was a pause while I tried to collect some random mathematical tit-bit from my brain which he’d invariably end with the roar, “Well Then, At Your Leisure!!!!!!!!” It was as if leisure was an indulgence, some unfortunate character failing that represented a selfish procrastination.

The maths teacher was fond of using Oxford dictionary definitions to describe his students, “The Oxford Dictionary defines an ignoramus as an ignorant or stupid person. So it’s nice to know you are in the good book.”

So I, just for him, checked the good book: it?defines leisure as “time when one is not working or occupied, free time”.

Taking the point leisure is your own particular time away from work, it would follow leisure would be kept aside for pursuits which result in pleasure.

This is where things can get odd. A boy I knew at school had a father who seemed constantly on the verge of explosion. He was one of the most nervously intense and cantankerous grown-ups I think I ever met, more volatile even than the bellowing maths teacher. Volcanic even when indulging in his passion for gem setting in a strange secretive little room he’d built beneath his back stairs.

It must have felt like a sweat box in Redcliffe’s subtropical summer. “No noise,” he would say. “I want my quiet time to enjoy myself.” Then would come muffled frustrated groans when the precision of gem setting got too much for him, and we’d quietly peek through a little window and see, bent over a gem setting plate, a creature bathed in a bright light. The magnifiers on his eyes made him look?like a strange insect.

If he stuffed something up, he’d ball his fists then silently scream. A Munch gem-setting Scream. Made you wonder how much enjoyment he derived from his leisure away from his occupation as, of all things, a flight traffic controller.

Surely your leisure should be a refuge from work?

My family’s male grown-up, my father, chose a more basic form of leisure which could sometimes be quite profound. The snooze. He had an ability to sleep anywhere when he wanted to get away from it all. It was nothing to come home and see him prone on the tray of one of his trucks or stretched out in state on a trestle table in the back yard. Dressed in stubbies and striped T-shirt, you’d go about your business until he woke, clapped his hands and say, “Lovely”.

I asked him if he dreamed when he snoozed. “If I do, it’s my business.”

I asked my mother where he’d found the gift of dropping off whenever and wherever he wanted. “Well, I suppose if you’ve fought in a war you find ways to sleep in almost any place.”

My father adored snoozing:?“A chance to start the day again and the only coot who never got any benefit from a nap was Hamlet –?too much per-chancing to dream. Stupid bugger.”

Today leisure can sometimes have a more regimented and organised feel. Almost purposeful.

As a kid, if you weren’t at school or in a part-time job you just generally mucked about and the same seemed to go for adults –?the gem-setting silent Munch scream and my snoozing dad.

But on a Saturday morning not long ago, I walked along one of the beaches in the town where I grew up and was quite interested in what went on.

In my youth, you’d see the odd swimmer returning from the water or people fishing at the water’s edge.

On that Saturday I saw?squads of people being barked at and drilled by personal trainers. A yoga class stood in their active wear, arms by their sides, breathing deep, contemplating their lesson, all wearing sunglasses as the sun shone bright and hot, reflecting off the sea. It reminded me of old films of atomic tests, where a group of people stand with goggles protecting their eyes from the exploding bomb. Regimented leisure.

The traffic moved in front of the Quality Leisure Park sign, I crept forward a few spaces almost as if a dice had been rolled and I was a part of some big board game.

And I thought of a preferred middle-aged leisure activity – the dinner party. It’s an odd sort of expression. It’s a social occasion that joins a long list of such events: lunch, brunch, barbecue, breakfast, a cocktail party, a pub crawl even. But you seldom meld them together. As in a dinner party. A dinner seems a bit formal and has an air of solemnity involved in the chewing of food. A party on the other hand denotes a bit of fun. A dinner party is also something you engage in as you get on, something a bit more reflective and sedate.

At university I didn’t do dinner parties. The circle I moved in engaged in Bin Parties. Preparations were extensive and nothing was left to chance. A large plastic rubbish pin, usually green with a black lid, was purchased from a hardware store and placed in the backyard. Guests would pour into the bin whatever it was they’d brought to drink, creating a haphazard punch.

The Bin Party’s appeal was best summed up by a large man who was a very good rower. He’d placed a six pack of Brisbane Bitter in the bin just after some bottles of Blackberry Nip had been poured in by a pair of nurses.?“This will be the only time Brisbane Bitter will be drinkable, Will. A miracle. Cheers.”

None of that behaviour at a dinner party, just good company, good food and good wine. Sort of. One?dinner in particular had a caveat attached –?a theme. Besides good company, good wine and good food guests all brought a board game from their youth.

A few people brought Monopoly, Chess and Scrabble but some surprise efforts got used as the night wore on. A retired police officer brought a Hide and Seek where the object was to find other players hiding in a variety of icons of some make-believe suburb –?dog kennel, a barrel, bins, stumps, post boxes and a pile of bricks. “He couldn’t leave his police career at home, always on the trail of somebody,” said the former policeman’s partner. “They always hide in the barrel you know,” said the ex-walloper.

There was Twister, a plastic sheet marked with different coloured dots and a wheel you would flick to indicate the coloured dots the players would have to put various parts of their bodies on. A doctor brought, of all things, Operation; an electrician a box of pick up sticks; a couple of teachers had Mousetrap.

I brought a game I had never played in my life but that had been in almost every house and home I have lived in. Squatter. It was described as the “Australian” board game, about making agricultural millions on the sheep’s back. The host, an engineer, chortled in delight. “Squatter!” He held it up and some other guests groaned. “Have you ever played this game? Has anyone here played this game?” It turned out none of us had but we all knew the cover very well. “Well,” said the host, “let’s keep it that way.”

I asked what had inspired the theme. “Thought it might be fun.” He was right. It stopped being a dinner party when we played Twister. “This,” said one of the teachers, trying to put her leg around the head of the lawyer to place her foot on a green dot, “isn’t advisable after having three children.”

It turned out to be a cracking night. Although whether the dusty morning after was caused by the wine or Twister I’m not sure. But sitting in my car, slowly rolling along past the Leisure Park’s sign, it struck me the board game dinner party really was what I would now call Quality Leisure.

William McInnes is an actor and an author; his latest novel is Full Bore.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Tennis superstars Nick Kyrgios and Eugenie Bouchard confide in each other over haters

09/10/2019 Posted by admin

Double trouble: Nick Kyrgios and Eugenie Bouchard play mixed doubles at last year’s US Open. Photo: Mike Frey/Tennis Photo NetworkTennis glamour duo Nick Kyrgios and Eugenie Bouchard –?arguably the?most scrutinised?players on tour – have confided in each other?over the difficulty of having to deal with some of the hatred directed towards them.
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The pair sent tongues wagging when they stepped out on court together in New York for mixed doubles at the 2015 US Open – a match made in Nike heaven that was likened more to an episode of The Bachelor than a grand slam hit-out.

Since the 2014 Australian Open, the pair were lumped with the burden of expectation that they would become the faces of the sport over the next decade.

But, for contrasting reasons, the Australian wild child and the talented Canadian have polarised opinion despite their enormous potential both on and off the court. Kyrgios, for his “don’t care” attitude, Bouchard, simply for her?attitude.

Unfortunately for the hottest young players on tour, that means they have had to become accustomed to dealing with the hate.

They have, however, managed to find solace in confiding in each other.

“Yeah, we have spoken about it a little bit,” Bouchard told Fairfax Media. “We just came to the conclusion that haters are going to hate and we weren’t going to listen to them. It’s really important to not listen to those people and just keep doing you. Why would you not do something because of somebody else’s opinion of you. Do you know what I mean?

“If you think about it, it’s actually crazy. Why should I allow somebody else to dictate my life??That’s Nick’s attitude as well and I think that’s really cool. I respect that.”

Despite?Kyrgios’ uncanny ability to find a headline and with Bouchard drawing criticism for her knack of finding a magazine cover, the pair remain two of the most marketable tennis players on tour.

Regardless of the criticism, Kyrgios remains a popular figure. His quarter-final against Andy Murray at the 2015 Australian Open peaked at 3.5 million viewers – higher?than the peak for the Novak Djokovic-Murray final a few days later.

While his match with Bouchard at Flushing Meadows sent social media into overdrive with all sorts of rumours given their flirtatious behaviour on court, Kyrgios is now in a relationship with Australian tennis player Ajla Tomljanovic.

But the 22-year-old Canadian admits she has fond memories of linking up with Kyrgios, who she expects to have a huge year coming back from suspension.

“That was awesome for me,” Bouchard said of the mixed doubles match with Kyrgios. “That was a great experience. I think Nick is?super talented and I think he’s going to have a huge year. I think you’ll find he exceeds people’s expectations this year.”

Bouchard, who earlier in the week admitted she had received death threats from obsessed fans, doesn’t regret the path she has taken as a professional tennis player.

She said she would continue to pursue her off-court opportunities, regardless of the criticism.

“You have to make the most of your life,” Bouchard said. “I don’t want to be the type to sit back and not do things and in 10 years look back and regret it. If my career were to end tomorrow it would have all been worth it.

“Obviously I want my career to go another 10 years and I want to achieve my ultimate dreams and goals, but my life is so unique compared to any other normal kid my age. Even if I never win another match on tour it’s still worth it because it’s an unbelievable experience.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

New head-high tackle laws changing Super Rugby preparation: Waratahs

09/10/2019 Posted by admin

Gone: Richard Barrington assists Geoff Parling after a high tackle that saw Barrington given the first red card under the new laws. Photo: Christopher LeeStrict new laws to rid rugby of head-high tackles are already changing Super Rugby.
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Just ask the Waratahs, who are tweaking their pre-season plans around what they predict will be the new reality of professional rugby: operating with 14?or 13?players on the field at some point during each game.

NSW defence coach Nathan Grey believes there is little else to conclude after reading the new laws, which take a zero-tolerance approach to contact with the neck and head,?and observing them in action in Europe.

“In terms of management from a coach’s perspective, you’ve got to prepare a bit more for having 14 guys on the field because it’s going to happen,” Grey said.

“They’ve said those accidental things that happen you’re going to get carded for, so you need to prepare that way to have 14 or 13 guys on the field a little bit more.?You’ve got to make sure you’re ready for that.”

Grey, a former Waratahs and Wallabies centre, supports the reforms and vouched?on Thursday for the work and planning behind their implementation.

“The golden question is the consistency around how they deliver on that,” he said.

“It’s going to be hard, but I think the reasonings around why they’ve done it and why it’s in place is the?right reason.?They’re trying to do the right things by the players, which is great, and the referees and the administration side of things, they’ve done a really thorough?process and they’re delivering it in a way that makes us confident as coaches to say ‘OK, that’s what they’ve said they’re going to be looking at, and what the expectation is around that’.

“There’s going to be some feeling out during the trials and into the first couple of rounds of Super [Rugby], but the consistency is the biggest thing and that’s all you hope for.”

The new laws, which mandate a yellow card for reckless contact with the head, come into effect at the Sydney Sevens in three weeks’ time. They will also be implemented during Super Rugby trial matches, which start in the first week of February, before the season proper starts on February 23.

They have been received controversially in Europe after taking effect on January 3 in?the English Premiership and Pro12, with a?raft of high-profile commentators and former players questioning their wisdom and, more pointedly, their implementation by referees.

Players making accidental contact with the head will be penalised, while anything deemed “reckless” will attract a yellow card – mandating 10 minutes in the sin bin – or a red card, meaning an early shower for the offending player.

Players will be punished even if the tackle starts below the shoulder and slips upwards, or if the ball carrier slips into the tackle.

Grey said the Waratahs were looking carefully at their technique, particularly at the ruck and breakdown.

“You never coach to target the head anyway, so from that perspective it’s not a massive change,” he said.?“It’s more having that awareness, particularly around your clean-out, that if you’re engaging the upper half of the body you have to make sure that you go nowhere near the head. That’s pretty easy for the players, in terms of just drilling that.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Australian Open 2017: The ‘Sir’ title ‘feels a bit strange to me’, says Andy Murray

09/10/2019 Posted by admin

Andy Murray at the opening of Under Armour at Chadstone Shopping Centre on Thursday. Photo: Joe ArmaoHe’s in Melbourne for the first time as the world No.1, many believe it’s his best chance to finally win the Australian Open and, unless you slept through the news over the New Year period, you’ll know he’s now known as Sir Andy Murray.
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The 29-year-old is in career best form after an outstanding 2016 that included claiming the top ranking, an Olympic gold medal in Rio, a second Wimbledon title and appearances in two other grand slam finals –?the Australian and French Open finals.

When he broke through in 2013 to become the first Brit to win Wimbledon since 1936, it was enough to add an OBE to his name. Another title at the All-England club last year has resulted in higher honours.

But the title doesn’t sit that comfortably him, mainly because of his young age, and he’s happy for people to still call him Andy. It has emerged that Australian host broadcaster Channel Seven has asked its commentators to refer to him as Sir Andy Murray.

“I was asked and I said, ‘No, I’m fine with Andy’. Andy’s fine,” Murray told Fairfax Media.

“And then on all the draw sheets and everything, and on the scoreboard, I was more than happy with it being Andy.

“The honour is great. Just having the ‘Sir’ in front of the name just feels a bit strange to me, mainly just because of my age. I feel too young for a name like that, I guess.”

Murray is again one of the main drawcards at the Australian Open, a tournament he’s finished runner-up five times since 2010, and the newly knighted star will join the likes of Sir Elton John and Sir Mick Jagger to headline the Rod Laver Arena stage.

But he’s having none of it. “I’m still hanging around the same people, the same friends, the same family. All my friends in the locker room have been laughing and joking about it.”

Murray’s 0-5 record in finals at Melbourne Park is the elephant in the room. It’s tough bringing up the subject, especially as he’s regularly fallen victim to long-time rival and six-time Australian Open champion Novak Djokovic.

“Here I’ve never beaten him and I’ve lost to him four or maybe five times. I can’t remember, but I’ve lost to him a bunch here. A couple of them were pretty tough matches. A couple of them were very easy for him, so I need to try and turn that around here. There’s a good chance that if I want to win the event I’d have to play against him,” Murray said.

“Hopefully, I can get by him this year but he’s definitely my biggest rival and someone that I’ve competed against for 18 years now.”

His second half of 2016 has instilled him with confidence, accumulating?28 consecutive ATP Tour wins which Djokovic ended in last week’s Qatar Open final.

“I got a good break at the end of last year. I needed it. And then trained, really really hard in the off-season with my team to make some improvements to things.

“Each year when I come I do think I’ve got a chance of winning. It’s just never happened for me here. Hopefully this year will be different.

“I do think the last few months of last year can help me, can give me a bunch of confidence. Other players look at that as well and see that you’re playing well and feel mentally and physically strong and in a good place.”

Andy Murray was making a special appearance at Chadstone Shopping Centre to open the Under?Armour?Brand House and unveil the new Threadborne performance apparel range?

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

India v Australia series: Glenn Maxwell, Mitchell Marsh firming for Test tour of India

09/10/2019 Posted by admin

Bowling brief: Mitchell Marsh. Photo: Paul KaneSelectors are strongly considering taking all-rounders Glenn Maxwell and Mitchell Marsh to India as part of a radical plan to increase their batting depth for the mighty challenge on the subcontinent.
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Just months after their Test prospects were hit for six, the pair are now firming as key additions to what would be one of the more unusual looking sides Australia have fielded in the five-day arena.

Trevor Hohns’ panel is in the process of finalising their squad for the four-Test series and are prepared to look outside the square for solutions to end Australia’s woes on the subcontinent.

And it would not get much more left-field than playing Maxwell and Marsh at numbers seven and eight as part of a lengthened batting line-up that would also provide extra options with the ball.

Their selection would raise eyebrows given the pair’s travails this summer but both have the weapons Australia need for success against the world No.1 – and are much stronger bowlers than incumbent all-rounder Hilton Cartwright.

While Maxwell’s skills as a hard-hitting batsman and capable spin bowler have long been thought of as vital in India, for Marsh it’s his credentials with the ball which could fast-track his Test recall five games after he was axed.

With an average of 23, Marsh’s batting was not deemed up to the standard for a top-six batsman however his bowling is much more highly rated.

Marsh’s ability to break the 140 km/h mark has him high up in calculations for selectors, who are hunting for a third quick who can bowl at high speed to support front men Mitchell Starc and Josh Hazlewood.

So desperate are selectors for a quick who is fast through the air, it’s understood the line has not been put through Pat Cummins for the tour despite the paceman’s desire to take a more gradual return to Test cricket after his lengthy battles with injury.

Marsh would bat in the lower order with the hope the reduced responsibility would give him the freedom to play his preferred aggressive game.

While Maxwell’s batting is considered his stronger suit, his off-spin has put him in the frame – possibly even at the expense of Nathan Lyon. Lyon is the superior bowler but his poor form on the subcontinent will be weighing heavily on selectors.

By picking Maxwell, they would have an explosive hitter in the middle and lower order who can turn the game in a session.

Steve O’Keefe, whose ability to keep the run rate down is highly valued, would then play as the No.1 spinner. The weakness in the plan is the poor form of wicketkeeper Matthew Wade though there is a chance Australia could be fielding a team where the No.10 has a first-class average in the 20s.

The over reliance on bit part players was viewed as a weakness in England’s failure in India, where they were trounced 4-0 despite three first innings scores of 400 or more. Coach and selector Darren Lehmann said things would have been different had England scored 500-plus.

“You need to make big, big scores and put pressure on India that way,” Lehmann said.

“I thought they played reasonably well with the bat so the challenge for our batting group is going big, much like we’ve done in the last two Test matches.”

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

NSW to push for final of T20 World Cup – with a major upgrade of the SCG to follow

12/09/2019 Posted by admin

The runaway train of the Big Bash League has convinced the NSW government to make a bold play for the men’s final of the World Twenty20 when it’s held in Australia in 2020.
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And should Sydney snatch it out of Melbourne’s grasp, expect the wise souls of the Sydney Cricket Ground Trust to push for new Brewongle-Churchill or O’Reilly stands at the beloved ground.

The significance of a full house at the Sixers-Thunders clash on Saturday night should not be overlooked.

For so long, Sydney has been branded “the toughest sporting market in the world”. Those banks of empty seats tell the score, or at least explain how bad the traffic is on the M5.

The Big Bash bucks the trend. All of the Thunder’s four matches at Spotless Stadium have been sold-out. The Sixers have been getting around 30,000 at the SCG.

Real beneficiary: The Sydney Cricket Ground.

So there can be no dispute: Sydneysiders have an insatiable appetite for Big Bash cricket. They’re mad for it. Gagging for it. It’s the Messina of Sydney sport.

Sensing this, the NSW government is eagerly awaiting Cricket Australia to formally start negotiations for World Cup matches. The women’s tournament will be held in February, 2020, with the men’s to be held in September and October. Imagine how popular the game will be by then.

With a capacity of more than 100,000, the MCG is considered an obvious choice for the men’s final.

It has hosted the finals of the last one-day international world cups, in 1992 and 2015, but that shouldn’t mean other states can’t push for the decider in 2020.

The real beneficiary of a Sydney final would be the SCG.

After NSW Premier Mike Baird took the side of NRL clubs and snubbed an upgrade of Allianz Stadium –?instead announcing a major upgrade of ANZ Stadium?with one at Parramatta already under way –?the new?focus is the SCG.

An upgrade of the Brewongle-Churchill stands will cost about $250 million. The O’Reilly Stand will cost about $100 million. That will take the capacity of the ground to beyond 54,000.

“We are about to begin our formal engagement with all states and territories,” a CA spokesperson said. “We are determined to take this exciting form of cricket to as many Australians as possible. That means there are many opportunities for stadiums, and their local communities, right around the country to put their hand up to host the world’s best cricketers.”

Come to Sydney, world’s best cricketers! We love our T20. Mad for it. And we have Messina.

Warne’s sledging agenda

Shane Warne’s continued attacks on Steve O’Keefe during the Sydney Test have left the Australian spinner’s family and friends angry and confused.

Under fire: Steve O’Keefe celebrates dismissing Misbah-ul-Haq. Photo: Getty Images

Just what is his problem with the affable and likeable New South Welshman? There seems to be more to it than the Victoria-NSW thing.

Warne wants a leg-spinner sent to India alongside offie Nathan Lyon, but his?vicious criticism in the Channel Nine commentary box – as well as outside of it –?on the final day was very personal.

“It’s the first one he’s turned all match,” Warne sneered when O’Keefe took one of his three crucial wickets as Australia completed a series whitewash against Pakistan at the SCG.

Warne is apparently on huge money to call cricket for Nine, with chatter at the network?suggesting?he’s on a day rate of more than five figures.

He’s not being paid to dish up platitudes and niceties. And we shall defer to Warne’s cricket judgment any day of the week.

But the regular sledges directed at O’Keefe before and during the Test suggested there was something more at play. It was reminiscent of his attacks not that long ago on fast bowler Mitchell Starc as “soft”.

We’re told O’Keefe has brushed off Warne’s comments, preferring to concentrate on some red-ball cricket to ensure he’s on the plane to India next month.

He will step out for Manly-Warringah at Manly Oval on Saturday to further his case for the Indian tour.

As a left-arm orthodox spin bowler, who has taken 222 first-class wickets at an average of 23, his selection is surely a no-brainer for the sub-continent … despite Warne’s campaign to ensure he’s not there.

Bring back Vonnie!

It’s the burning question of the rugby league off-season.

No, not which club will sign Ben Hunt, whether Kieran Foran will be cleared to play for the Warriors or if there will be one last off-field incident before the end March.

Most importantly, will the great Yvonne “Vonnie” Sampson be appearing on Fox Sports in round one?

Switch: Yvonne Sampson, pictured here with Wayne Bennett, has made the switch to Fox Sports. Photo: James Brickwood

Sampson made the switch from Nine to Fox Sports during the off-season, but Nine claims there was a six-month non-compete clause in her?deal and that threatens to bench her for the season kick-off on March 2.

All parties remain tight-lipped about the issue. It’s in the hands of the lawyers, as they say in the classics.

But our information is a compromise is likely and she will take her place on the Fox Sports panel.

I’m slightly biased but let’s hope so: she makes watching the footy better.

Bad news for “brother” Bell

Celebrity accountant Anthony Bell’s long line of sporting star mates are privately shocked and dismayed about reports this week concerning his marriage with TV presenter Kelly Landry.

Bell did not appear in Waverley Court on Thursday but agreed, through his lawyer Chris Murphy, to the terms of an apprehended violence order preventing him from coming near Landry?for 12 hours?after he has been drinking alcohol or taking illicit substances.

Murphy said Bell never wanted to see Landry again and wanted to avoid a “nasty court case” that could harm his children if she were cross-examined in a hearing.

It’s no secret that Bell is extremely close to former Australian captain Michael Clarke, who described him in his recently released autobiography as a “brother”.

As many reporters know, Bell is quickly on the phone trying to smooth the waters whenever something critical of Clarke is written.

Clarke wrote in his book: “In tough times, I am always able to rely on him, and he proved that in spades when he smuggled me away from the media’s eyes during my break-up [to fiancee Lara Bingle]. He came to Bondi and parked in the garage. I slipped down through an internal lift and climbed into the boot of his car. He exited into the media circus. With all the cameras and microphones on him, he said, ‘No, Michael’s not in the house’. That’s right – I was in the boot.”

Five cheers for Tomic

They always pick on the fat kid.

Normally dismissive of those heathens of the press, tennis wild child Bernard Tomic was so proud of stripping five kilograms in the space of a week that he actively went about telling reporters in Sydney all about it whenever he spotted them.

Tomic was stung by claims he was unfit at the Brisbane International and turned up in Sydney brandishing a lighter frame. “You can say last week I was fat,” he said.

Maybe he could pass on some tips to one NRL club we’re told is making its cheerleaders weigh-in before they make the cut for the upcoming season.

What next? Skinfolds? Probably.

Believe me because I know it: they always pick on the fat kid.

The quote

“A school teacher who can fight – every delinquent kid in the world will take notice.” –?Boxing promoter?Bob Arum?on?Jeff Horn, the Queenslander who will step into the ring with Arum’s superstar fighter?Manny?Pacquiao?in April.

Night to remember: Jeff Horn and Manny Pacquiao. Photo: Getty Images

Thumbs up

It was?one of the most succinct?takedowns?we’ve seen of US President-elect?Donald Trump. No, it didn’t come from?Meryl?Streep?at the Golden Globes but?Nick?Kyrgios?and?the “F— Donald Trump” t-shirt he wore after the Fast4 tournament. New-found respect.

Thumbs down

Regardless of what you think about?James Hird, the finger-pointing about who’s to blame for his suspected overdose has been ugly and unnecessary. So, too, the media intrusion since the incident happened. Hird is no saint –?as some have painted him – but he deserves some space.

It’s a big weekend for … the 80,000 people who will cram Moore Park for the Big Bash derby between the Sixers and the Thunder, and the A-League derby between Sydney FC and the Wanderers. Suggested transport: helicopter.

It’s an even bigger weekend for …?Chris Lynn, who is expected to make his debut for Australia in the ODI match against Pakistan at the Gabba on Friday. To steal a line from Jamiroquai, it will be “Virtual Lynnsanity”. (Sorry, second week back. They’ll get better).

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Anti-terrorism measures may change Anzac Dayphotos

12/09/2019 Posted by admin

Anti-terrorism measures for Anzac Day East Maitland’s Anzac Day service. Pictures: Perry Duffin
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Anzac Day dawn service at Maitland Park. Picture: Perry Duffin

Morpeth Anzac Day service. Picture: Belinda-Jane Davis

Nobbys Anzac Day dawn service. Photo by Simone DePeak

Nobbys Anzac Day dawn service. Photo by Simone DePeak

Nobbys Anzac Day dawn service. Photo by Simone DePeak

Nobbys Anzac Day dawn service. Photo by Simone DePeak

Nobbys Anzac Day dawn service. Photo by Simone DePeak

Nobbys Anzac Day dawn service. Photo by Simone DePeak

Nobbys Anzac Day dawn service. Photo by Simone DePeak

Nobbys Anzac Day dawn service. Photo by Simone DePeak

Nobbys Anzac Day dawn service. Photo by Simone DePeak

Nobbys Anzac Day dawn service. Photo by Simone DePeak

Nobbys Anzac Day dawn service. Photo by Simone DePeak

Nobbys Anzac Day dawn service. Photo by Simone DePeak

Nobbys Anzac Day dawn service. Photo by Simone DePeak

Nobbys Anzac Day dawn service. Photo by Simone DePeak

Nobbys Anzac Day dawn service. Photo by Simone DePeak

Nobbys Anzac Day dawn service. Photo by Simone DePeak

Nobbys Anzac Day dawn service. Photo by Simone DePeak

Nobbys Anzac Day dawn service. Photo by Simone DePeak

Nobbys Anzac Day dawn service. Photo by Simone DePeak

Anzac Day dawn service at Maitland Park. Picture: Perry Duffin

Anzac Day dawn service at Maitland Park. Picture: Perry Duffin

Anzac Day dawn service at Maitland Park. Picture: Perry Duffin

Anzac Day dawn service at Maitland Park. Picture: Perry Duffin

Anzac Day dawn service at Maitland Park. Picture: Perry Duffin

Anzac Day dawn service at Maitland Park. Picture: Perry Duffin

Anzac Day dawn service at Maitland Park. Picture: Perry Duffin

Anzac Day dawn service at Maitland Park. Picture: Perry Duffin

Anzac Day dawn service at Maitland Park. Picture: Perry Duffin

Anzac Day dawn service at Maitland Park. Picture: Perry Duffin

Anzac Day dawn service at Maitland Park. Picture: Perry Duffin

Anzac Day dawn service at Maitland Park. Picture: Perry Duffin

Cessnock’s Anzac Day dawn service. Picture: Krystal Sellars

Dawn service in Clarence Town. Picture: Janelle O’Neill

Dawn service in Clarence Town. Picture: Janelle O’Neill

Dawn service in Clarence Town. Picture: Janelle O’Neill

Dawn service in Clarence Town. Picture: Janelle O’Neill

Dawn service in Clarence Town. Picture: Janelle O’Neill

Dawn service in Clarence Town. Picture: Janelle O’Neill

Dawn service in Clarence Town. Picture: Janelle O’Neill

Dawn service in Clarence Town. Picture: Janelle O’Neill

Dawn service in Clarence Town. Picture: Janelle O’Neill

Dawn service in Clarence Town. Picture: Janelle O’Neill

Dawn service in Clarence Town. Picture: Janelle O’Neill

Dawn service in Clarence Town. Picture: Janelle O’Neill

Dawn service in Clarence Town. Picture: Janelle O’Neill

Dawn service in Clarence Town. Picture: Janelle O’Neill

Dawn service in Clarence Town. Picture: Janelle O’Neill

Dawn service in Clarence Town. Picture: Janelle O’Neill

Dawn service in Clarence Town. Picture: Janelle O’Neill

Dawn service in Clarence Town. Picture: Janelle O’Neill

Dawn service in Clarence Town. Picture: Janelle O’Neill

Dawn service in Clarence Town. Picture: Janelle O’Neill

Dawn service in Clarence Town. Picture: Janelle O’Neill

Anzac Day dawn service in Nelson Bay. Picture: Ellie-Marie Watts

Anzac Day dawn service in Nelson Bay. Picture: Ellie-Marie Watts

Anzac Day dawn service in Nelson Bay. Picture: Ellie-Marie Watts

Anzac Day dawn service in Nelson Bay. Picture: Ellie-Marie Watts

Anzac Day dawn service in Nelson Bay. Picture: Ellie-Marie Watts

Anzac Day dawn service in Nelson Bay. Picture: Ellie-Marie Watts

Anzac Day dawn service in Nelson Bay. Picture: Ellie-Marie Watts

Anzac Day dawn service in Nelson Bay. Picture: Ellie-Marie Watts

Anzac Day dawn service in Nelson Bay. Picture: Ellie-Marie Watts

Anzac Day dawn service in Nelson Bay. Picture: Ellie-Marie Watts

Anzac Day dawn service in Nelson Bay. Picture: Ellie-Marie Watts

Anzac Day dawn service in Nelson Bay. Picture: Ellie-Marie Watts

Anzac service Speers Point. Pictures: Matthew Kelly and Christine Field

Anzac service Speers Point. Pictures: Matthew Kelly and Christine Field

Anzac service Speers Point. Pictures: Matthew Kelly and Christine Field

Anzac service Speers Point. Pictures: Matthew Kelly and Christine Field

Anzac service Speers Point. Pictures: Matthew Kelly and Christine Field

Anzac service Speers Point. Pictures: Matthew Kelly and Christine Field

Anzac service Speers Point. Pictures: Matthew Kelly and Christine Field

Anzac service Speers Point. Pictures: Matthew Kelly and Christine Field

Anzac Day service at the War Graves at Dungog Cemetery. Picture: Janelle O’Neill

Anzac Day service at the War Graves at Dungog Cemetery. Picture: Janelle O’Neill

Anzac Day service at the War Graves at Dungog Cemetery. Picture: Janelle O’Neill

Anzac Day service at the War Graves at Dungog Cemetery. Picture: Janelle O’Neill

Anzac Day service at the War Graves at Dungog Cemetery. Picture: Janelle O’Neill

Anzac Day service at the War Graves at Dungog Cemetery. Picture: Janelle O’Neill

March down Hunter St Newcastle to the Anzac Day Service at Civic Park. Picture: Simone DePeak

March down Hunter St Newcastle to the Anzac Day Service at Civic Park. Picture: Simone DePeak

March down Hunter St Newcastle to the Anzac Day Service at Civic Park. Picture: Simone DePeak

March down Hunter St Newcastle to the Anzac Day Service at Civic Park. Picture: Simone DePeak

March down Hunter St Newcastle to the Anzac Day Service at Civic Park. Picture: Simone DePeak

March down Hunter St Newcastle to the Anzac Day Service at Civic Park. Picture: Simone DePeak

March down Hunter St Newcastle to the Anzac Day Service at Civic Park. Picture: Simone DePeak

March down Hunter St Newcastle to the Anzac Day Service at Civic Park. Picture: Simone DePeak

March down Hunter St Newcastle to the Anzac Day Service at Civic Park. Picture: Simone DePeak

March down Hunter St Newcastle to the Anzac Day Service at Civic Park. Picture: Simone DePeak

March down Hunter St Newcastle to the Anzac Day Service at Civic Park. Picture: Simone DePeak

March down Hunter St Newcastle to the Anzac Day Service at Civic Park. Picture: Simone DePeak

March down Hunter St Newcastle to the Anzac Day Service at Civic Park. Picture: Simone DePeak

March down Hunter St Newcastle to the Anzac Day Service at Civic Park. Picture: Simone DePeak

March down Hunter St Newcastle to the Anzac Day Service at Civic Park. Picture: Simone DePeak

March down Hunter St Newcastle to the Anzac Day Service at Civic Park. Picture: Simone DePeak

March down Hunter St Newcastle to the Anzac Day Service at Civic Park. Picture: Simone DePeak

Anzac Day in Muswellbrook. Picture: Betina Hughes

Anzac Day in Muswellbrook. Picture: Betina Hughes

Anzac Day in Muswellbrook. Picture: Betina Hughes

Anzac Day in Muswellbrook. Picture: Betina Hughes

Anzac Day in Muswellbrook. Picture: Betina Hughes

Anzac Day in Muswellbrook. Picture: Betina Hughes

Anzac Day in Muswellbrook. Picture: Betina Hughes

Anzac Day in Muswellbrook. Picture: Betina Hughes

Anzac Day in Muswellbrook. Picture: Betina Hughes

Anzac Day in Muswellbrook. Picture: Betina Hughes

Anzac Day in Muswellbrook. Picture: Betina Hughes

Anzac Day in Muswellbrook. Picture: Betina Hughes

Anzac Day in Muswellbrook. Picture: Betina Hughes

Anzac Day in Muswellbrook. Picture: Betina Hughes

Anzac Day in Muswellbrook. Picture: Betina Hughes

Anzac Day in Muswellbrook. Picture: Betina Hughes

Anzac Day in Muswellbrook. Picture: Betina Hughes

Anzac Day in Muswellbrook. Picture: Betina Hughes

Anzac Day in Muswellbrook. Picture: Betina Hughes

Anzac Day in Muswellbrook. Picture: Betina Hughes

Anzac Day in Muswellbrook. Picture: Betina Hughes

Anzac Day in Muswellbrook. Picture: Betina Hughes

Anzac Day in Muswellbrook. Picture: Betina Hughes

Anzac Day in Muswellbrook. Picture: Betina Hughes

Anzac Day in Muswellbrook. Picture: Betina Hughes

Anzac Day in Muswellbrook. Picture: Betina Hughes

Crowds gathered for the Anzac Day dawn service at East Maitland. Pictures: Maitland Christian School

Crowds gathered for the Anzac Day dawn service at East Maitland. Pictures: Maitland Christian School

Crowds gathered for the Anzac Day dawn service at East Maitland. Pictures: Maitland Christian School

Crowds gathered for the Anzac Day dawn service at East Maitland. Pictures: Maitland Christian School

Crowds gathered for the Anzac Day dawn service at East Maitland. Pictures: Maitland Christian School

East Maitland’s Anzac Day service. Pictures: Perry Duffin

East Maitland’s Anzac Day service. Pictures: Perry Duffin

East Maitland’s Anzac Day service. Pictures: Perry Duffin

East Maitland’s Anzac Day service. Pictures: Perry Duffin

East Maitland’s Anzac Day service. Pictures: Perry Duffin

East Maitland’s Anzac Day service. Pictures: Perry Duffin

East Maitland’s Anzac Day service. Pictures: Perry Duffin

East Maitland’s Anzac Day service. Pictures: Perry Duffin

East Maitland’s Anzac Day service. Pictures: Perry Duffin

East Maitland’s Anzac Day service. Pictures: Perry Duffin

East Maitland’s Anzac Day service. Pictures: Perry Duffin

East Maitland’s Anzac Day service. Pictures: Perry Duffin

East Maitland’s Anzac Day service. Pictures: Perry Duffin

East Maitland’s Anzac Day service. Pictures: Perry Duffin

East Maitland’s Anzac Day service. Pictures: Perry Duffin

East Maitland’s Anzac Day service. Pictures: Perry Duffin

East Maitland’s Anzac Day service. Pictures: Perry Duffin

East Maitland’s Anzac Day service. Pictures: Perry Duffin

East Maitland’s Anzac Day service. Pictures: Perry Duffin

East Maitland’s Anzac Day service. Pictures: Perry Duffin

East Maitland’s Anzac Day service. Pictures: Perry Duffin

East Maitland’s Anzac Day service. Pictures: Perry Duffin

East Maitland’s Anzac Day service. Pictures: Perry Duffin

East Maitland’s Anzac Day service. Pictures: Perry Duffin

East Maitland’s Anzac Day service. Pictures: Perry Duffin

East Maitland’s Anzac Day service. Pictures: Perry Duffin

Scone Anzac Day march. Picture: Ben Murphy

Scone Anzac Day march. Picture: Ben Murphy

Scone Anzac Day march. Picture: Ben Murphy

Scone Anzac Day dawn service. Picture: Emma Burnett

Scone Anzac Day march. Picture: Ben Murphy

Scone Anzac Day dawn service. Picture: Emma Burnett

Scone Anzac Day dawn service. Picture: Emma Burnett

Scone Anzac Day march. Picture: Ben Murphy

Scone Anzac Day march. Picture: Ben Murphy

Morpeth Anzac Day service. Picture: Belinda-Jane Davis

Morpeth Anzac Day service. Picture: Belinda-Jane Davis

Morpeth Anzac Day service. Picture: Belinda-Jane Davis

Morpeth Anzac Day service. Picture: Belinda-Jane Davis

Morpeth Anzac Day service. Picture: Belinda-Jane Davis

Morpeth Anzac Day service. Picture: Belinda-Jane Davis

Morpeth Anzac Day service. Picture: Belinda-Jane Davis

Morpeth Anzac Day service. Picture: Belinda-Jane Davis

Morpeth Anzac Day service. Picture: Belinda-Jane Davis

Morpeth Anzac Day service. Picture: Belinda-Jane Davis

Morpeth Anzac Day service. Picture: Belinda-Jane Davis

Morpeth Anzac Day service. Picture: Belinda-Jane Davis

Morpeth Anzac Day service. Picture: Belinda-Jane Davis

Morpeth Anzac Day service. Picture: Belinda-Jane Davis

Morpeth Anzac Day service. Picture: Belinda-Jane Davis

Morpeth Anzac Day service. Picture: Belinda-Jane Davis

Morpeth Anzac Day service. Picture: Belinda-Jane Davis

Morpeth Anzac Day service. Picture: Belinda-Jane Davis

Morpeth Anzac Day service. Picture: Belinda-Jane Davis

Morpeth Anzac Day service. Picture: Belinda-Jane Davis

Morpeth Anzac Day service. Picture: Belinda-Jane Davis

Morpeth Anzac Day service. Picture: Belinda-Jane Davis

Morpeth Anzac Day service. Picture: Belinda-Jane Davis

Morpeth Anzac Day service. Picture: Belinda-Jane Davis

Morpeth Anzac Day service. Picture: Belinda-Jane Davis

Morpeth Anzac Day service. Picture: Belinda-Jane Davis

Morpeth Anzac Day service. Picture: Belinda-Jane Davis

Morpeth Anzac Day service. Picture: Belinda-Jane Davis

Morpeth Anzac Day service. Picture: Belinda-Jane Davis

Morpeth Anzac Day service. Picture: Belinda-Jane Davis

Anzac Day in Singleton. Picture: Louise Nichols

Anzac Day in Singleton. Picture: Louise Nichols

Anzac Day in Singleton. Picture: Louise Nichols

Anzac Day in Singleton. Picture: Louise Nichols

Anzac Day in Singleton. Picture: Louise Nichols

Anzac Day in Singleton. Picture: Louise Nichols

Anzac Day in Singleton. Picture: Louise Nichols

Anzac Day in Singleton. Picture: Louise Nichols

Anzac Day in Singleton. Picture: Louise Nichols

Anzac Day in Singleton. Picture: Louise Nichols

Anzac Day in Singleton. Picture: Louise Nichols

Anzac Day in Singleton. Picture: Louise Nichols

Anzac Day in Singleton. Picture: Louise Nichols

Anzac Day in Singleton. Picture: Louise Nichols

Anzac Day in Singleton. Picture: Louise Nichols

Anzac Day in Singleton. Picture: Louise Nichols

Anzac Day in Singleton. Picture: Louise Nichols

Anzac Day in Singleton. Picture: Louise Nichols

Anzac Day in Singleton. Picture: Louise Nichols

TweetFacebookThis article was first published on the Maitland Mercury

Warrnambool’s Maremmas have been keeping campers awake at night

12/09/2019 Posted by admin

New maremma puppy at Flagstaff Hill. Pictured: The new 12-week-old female puppy at Flagstaff Hill, who will be named in an upcoming contest. Picture: Amy Paton
Nanjing Night Net

WARRNAMBOOL’S Maremmas may be a tourist drawcard, but they’ve also been a problemfor some visitors this summer.

Incessant barking from the dogs at Flagstaff Hill has been keeping campers awake at night in the nearby Surfside Holiday Park.

Mt Gambier’s Lea Clark, who has been staying at Surfside for 36 years, said the nightly barking “had been going on for three weeks”.

She said the dogs were a great tourist attraction but“enough was enough”.

“Most nights we’d wake with the barking,” Ms Clark said.

“It’s a talking point in the park. Our whole aisle was talking about it, and the people behind us were having a big conversation about ‘those bloody dogs’,that they look good but we’d wish they’d shut up at night.”

On Wednesday night, Surfside Holiday Park campers finally got some sleep after the council responded to complaints.

“It was certainly a good night’s sleep last night,” Ms Clark said.

“It was quite noticeable that the dogs weren’t there.”

The council’s manager of visitor economy David McMahon said the dogs –Amor, Avis, Eudy and Tula – usually stay overnight with a flock of chickens at Flagstaff Hill as part of their training.

But in response to the complaintsmeasures have been put “in place to try and prevent the dogs from disturbing campers in the future”,” Mr McMahon said.

“With the increased activity at Surfside, the dogs have been barking more than usual as a way to protect the chickens,” he explained.

“While we need to make sure that our Maremmas’ guardian instincts remain sharp so they can continue to guard the penguin colony, we also need to respect everyone’s right to be able to get a good night’s sleep.

“When staying overnight at Flagstaff Hill, the dogs are now being kept in their enclosures rather than remaining in the paddock with the chickens.

“There is a farm where Eudy and Tula have previously stayed when not on the island, and they spent Wednesday night there.

“We have had no further complaints since we have put these measures in place.

“The dogs are trained to protect a flock of chickens at Flagstaff Hill. This is a crucial step which has allowed them to successfully protect the penguin colony on Middle Island.”

This article was first published on The Standard

Federal pollies cost Hunter $800k in six months

12/09/2019 Posted by admin

BIG SPENDERS: The Hunter’s federal MPs racked up an $800,00 expenses bill in the first six months of 2016. Retired Paterson MP Bob Baldwin spent $169,000, including three return trips to Perth. PICTURE: Glen McCurtayneBOB Baldwin charged taxpayers thousands of dollars for two trips to Perth in the months before he left parliament to meet with businessmen he now lobbies for.
Nanjing Night Net

The former Paterson MP was a backbencher in the final months of his parliamentary career when he spent almost $7000 on flights to meet with representatives from a company called Bluesightthat he now lists as a client of his new lobbyist firm, Outcomes Strategies Group.

Mr Baldwin said the trips were legitimate parliamentary business, that he had yet to receive any money from Bluesight, and that he had acted within the rules for lobbyists.

However the Australian government’s lobbyist code of conduct states ministers or parliamentary secretaries cannot lobby for activities “relating to any matter that they had official dealings with”in the last 18 months of their parliamentary career for 18 months after leaving office.

Mr Baldwin said the trips – in January and February of last year – related to his previous work as the parliamentary secretary for the environmentand that the then minister, Greg Hunt, had asked him to continue his work in the portfolio after he was demoted in Malcolm Turnbull’s first ministry.

During the trips, Mr Baldwin said he met with representatives from Engas and Bluesight, two sustainable energy firms that share a director – Brian Foster.

Mr Baldwin met with Mr Foster on at least one other occasion while still parliamentary secretary in 2015.

But Mr Baldwin denied the trips were an attempt to drum up work, and said he had “never received any payment from Brian Foster or campaign donations”.

He said he had still not received any payment from Bluesight, and was “doing the work out of personal interest”.

Mr Baldwin was the parliamentary secretary for the environment from December 2014 to September 2015,butsaid he continued to work on the portfolio, maintaining “dialogue with various players in the industry”.

“They were doing work on synthetic greenhouse gases, and I was still doing work with Greg Hunt in relation to the Montreal Protocol on the reduction of synthetic greenhouse gases,” he said.

Mr Hunt’s office provided theNewcastle Heraldwith a letter he sent to Mr Baldwin in which he thanked him for his work in the portfolio, and said that “given your background” he would “welcome your continued engagement and reports on ozone, synthetic greenhouse gas and natural refrigerant issues”.

Hunter federal MPs Pat Conroy, Meryl Swanson, Joel Fitzgibbon and Sharon Claydon. PICTURE: Jonathan Carroll

He did not respond to an inquiry about when the letter was sent.

It comes as aHeraldanalysis of politicians expenditurereveals the Hunter’s federal MPs racked up an $860,000 expenses bill in the first six months of 2016.

Hunter MP Joel Fitzgibbon, the shadow agriculture minister, was the region’s biggest spender, shelling out $243,000 on travel costs, office expenses and electorate materials.

He said he believed politician’s expenses should be published more often, to increase transparency.

“Atthe moment we table claims every sixmonths so what you end up with is a big wad of paperwork a long time after the event,” he said.

“People see the costs, but what they don’t see is me when I’mup at 5am and awake until midnight travelling around the country,” he said.

Mr Fitzgibbon’s expensesincluded a week-long“overseas study trip” to the United Kingdom in January 2016 that cost taxpayers $8682, which he said was “invaluable”.

The two page “overseas study report” –which isthe only requirement the Finance Department places on MPs who take from taxpayer-funded overseas trips –stated the “main purpose” of hisvisit “was to further my knowledge of recent developments in the politics of the United Kingdom and implications for our own democracy and parliamentary system”.

During the trip he met with Lynton Crosby, top Liberal Party strategist and an adviser to the British Conservative Government, as well as a number of British Labour figures including EdMiliband’s former policy guru Lord Maurice Glasman, a prominent left-wing backer of Brexit.

“As part of my consultations, I attended a Labour conference in Birmingham where I spoke with a range of British Labour Party members about their most recent election outcome and the Party’s subsequent leadership election process and Its consequences for parliamentary democracy in the United Kingdom,” he wrote.

Among the Hunter’s other MPs, Newcastle’sSharon Claydon spent $174,000 whileShortland MP Pat Conroy –the shadow assistant minister for climate change and infrastructure – spent $169,500.

Mr Baldwin also spent about $169,000, including onhis two trips to Perth.

A third trip toPerth in April cost $3750 in flights and car hire costs.

Mr Baldwin said that trip was to meet with representatives from Civmec, the company that acquired Forgacs last year to receive a briefing about the company’s intentions for the Tomago shipyard.

It was immediately after his return from the third Perthtrip that Mr Baldwin announced he would not recontest his seat at the 2016 federal election after previously sayinghe would run again.

Anthony Bell never wants to see wife Kelly Landry again, court hears

12/09/2019 Posted by admin

Kelly Landry and Anthony Bell in happier times. Photo: Belinda Rolland Kelly Landry leaving court after her husband accepted terms of the AVO. Photo: Daniel Munoz
Nanjing Night Net

Champion sailor and accountancy chief executive Anthony Bell never wants to see his wife Kelly Landry again, his lawyer told a court during her?application for an apprehended?violence order.

Ms Landry, a former television presenter and model, sat in Sydney’s Waverley Local Court on Thursday morning as her husband’s solicitor?Chris Murphy?said his client would seek?a divorce.

Mr Bell?did not appear but a spokesman?later said he had filed divorce papers with the Family Court?during the morning.

Mr Murphy said?the claims behind Ms Landry’s?AVO application?were “fallacious” and made by someone “perhaps suffering a little bit of celebrity deprivation”.

But he told the court Mr Bell would accept?the terms of a modified AVO, which prevented?him from attending the couple’s home, while?continuing?to support Ms Landry and their children.

“The defendant is not going back to the house,” Mr Murphy said. “He doesn’t want to see her again.”

An original order sought by Ms Landry?would have prevented Mr Bell from seeing her for 12 hours after he had been drinking or taking illicit substances?but that provision was deleted on Thursday, Mr Bell’s lawyers said.

Mr Murphy said his client?had never used drugs.

“He doesn’t have the drinking problem in this household,” he said.

The pair, who married in 2011, were photographed warmly embracing after Mr Bell skippered his supermaxi Perpetual Loyal to claim line honours in the Sydney to Hobart yacht race on December 28.

Mr Murphy said Mr Bell and Ms Landry had a “peaceful” dinner that night but that Ms Landry?had reported feeling?“barely acknowledged” after the win.

Despite accepting the 12-month interim AVO order, Mr Murphy said his client wanted to avoid a “nasty court case” that could harm his children.

“My client’s fear is that the necessity of cross-examination of the children’s mother that this prosecution would entail would create a public record that would always be there,” he said.

According to Mr Murphy, Ms?Landry?told her husband she had asked police to withdraw the AVO application. But the police prosecutor persisted with it on Thursday.

In an email to clients on Monday, Mr Bell said he abhorred violence and had never taken a drug.

“By now you may have seen a most distressing piece of news about my?family involving some allegations my wife has made about me,” he wrote.?“There is?an allegation that I pushed her in November …?I did not push her.

“There is an allegation I spoke loudly and embarrassed her in front of friends. It did not happen.”

Mr Bell, the founder and chief executive of the accountancy firm Bell Partners, works for celebrity clients including former Australian cricket captain Michael Clarke, Channel Nine personality Karl Stefanovic and?TV host?Larry?Edmur.

The AVO matter has been set to return to court on February 17.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.